Frequently Asked Questions

General Questions

  1. What kinds of concerns should I report?
  2. Can I report employment concerns that are not policy violations?
  3. What are my other reporting options?
  4. What happens when I call the toll-free number?
  5. I have documentation to support my concern. What should I do with it?
  6. How can I follow up on a report I've made?
  7. If I come across additional information or concerns, who should I contact?
  8. What are my responsibilities in making a report or in an investigation?
  9. How long will the investigation take?
  10. How can I find out about the status of any investigation about my report?
  11. Will I be told about the details about an investigation or its outcome/result?
  12. Is there a University policy that talks about the hotline and reporting?

Protections for Reporters

  1. What should I do if I feel I am being retaliated against for making the report?

Student Concerns

  1. I'm a Student. What should I report here?

More on Anonymous and Confidential Reporting

  1. Can I make a truly anonymous report?
  2. Where does my report go?
  3. Who at the University sees my report?
  4. Will anyone outside the University see my report?
  5. If I file a report anonymously, will anyone at the University ever learn my identity?
  6. Will my supervisor be told about the allegation?
  7. Who else in my unit might find out?
  8. My report will say that a co-worker or supervisor is doing something wrong. Will that person learn I am the source of the report?
  9. Can I continue to provide information to the University after I've filed a report and remain anonymous?
  10. Who can I talk to about making a report or this reporting service?

General Questions

  1. What kinds of concerns should I report?
    You should report any situation or University conduct you believe violates a law, regulation, government contract or grant requirement, or University policy. (But use 911 for emergencies!) You do not need to know the exact law or requirement, or be certain a violation has occurred or will occur. If you suspect something is wrong, the better course of action is always to report it. Examples of issues to report include theft; wage, benefit, or hours abuses; discrimination or sexual harassment; misuse of University property, or equipment; violation of safety rules; OSHA or environmental abuse concerns; conflicts of interest; NCAA violations; and intentional misuse of the University's network or computers. Select a campus location on the reporting Web homepage, and click on the violation categories which appear on the following page for a more complete list of issues.
  2. Can I report employment concerns that are not policy violations?
    Ureport is intended to investigate violations of laws, rules, regulations or University policy. If you have an employment concern that is not a violation you should contact your HR Professional.
  3. What are my other reporting options?
    Frequently, the best place to raise a concern or ask a question is within your own college or unit through ordinary supervisory or departmental channels. Many colleges and units also have identified a specific person to handle questions or reports about something you think may be wrong. You may also be able to raise your concern with specific University offices established to handle certain types of issues. See "Other Reporting Options and Resources" for more.
  4. What happens when I call the toll-free number?
    You will be greeted by an EthicsPoint call center staff person. You will be asked to provide the same information that you would provide if you were using the online report form. The interviewer will type your responses into the system and use that to generate an electronic report. These electronic reports have the same security and confidentiality protections as a report that you would enter directly online.
  5. I have documentation to support my concern. What should I do with it?
    If your documentation is in an electronic format, you may upload it to your online report. Select your campus location, violation category and violation description. After you select a violation, you will be directed to a Report Form. Use the link "Click here to upload files" that appears toward the end of the Report Form. If you make a report by telephone or have documentation that cannot be uploaded, you should indicate in your report that you have documentation that you haven't included. The University official handling the report will contact you about how to submit the information. (See "Can I continue to provide information to the University after I've filed a report and remain anonymous?".)
  6. How can I follow up on a report I've made?
    When you file a report, either by calling the toll-free number or by submitting a report online, you will receive a unique username and be asked to choose a password. You will need to retain these to return to a report you previously filed. To follow up on a report over the phone, call the toll free number again and tell the interviewer that you are following up on a report. You will be asked for your username and unique password. To follow up on a report over the internet, go to the University's reporting Web homepage (www.Ureport.ethicspoint.com), click on the "Follow up on a Report" button, and enter your username and password. This will take you to the report you previously filed and a link to "Post a Follow-Up Note" or "Upload File." You may also go to www.ethicspoint.com, chose "File a New or Follow-up on a Report," enter "University of Minnesota" in the organization name field, and follow the same steps for posting a note or uploading a file.
  7. If I come across additional information or concerns, who should I contact?
    You can always add additional information to your original report (see "How can I follow up on a report I've made?"). The University official handling the report will be alerted that you have amended your report and will review any new information. If you have provided your name and are contacted by the University official handling the report, then communicate any further information or concerns directly to that official.
  8. What are my responsibilities in making a report or in an investigation?
    You are expected be acting in "good faith" in making a report. This means that you provide information you know or suspect is true. You are also expected to cooperate in any investigation that may arise as a result of a report. Depending upon the allegations in your report, this could include discussions with you. All University employees are expected to be truthful and candid during any investigation of illegal or wrongful conduct. Indeed, providing information known to be false or intentionally misleading, either in a report or during the course of an investigation, is a serious matter that could result in discipline or termination.
  9. How long will the investigation take?
    The length of the investigation depends upon many factors, such as the complexity of the issue, the number of people involved, the nature and extent of documents or other evidence involved, and the urgency of the matter. If you return to the Web homepage to follow-up on a report, you should receive an initial response within 5-7 business days.
  10. How can I find out about the status of any investigation about my report?
    If you have reported anonymously, you may post a request for an update. (see "How can I follow up on a report I've made?"). If you have provided your name, and have been contacted directly by a University official looking into your report, you should communicate directly with that official to determine the best method to learn about the status.
  11. Will I be told about the details about an investigation or its outcome/result?
    In most cases, you will be told whether your reported issue was investigated, and whether it was resolved. There are, however, legal and other restrictions on what information the University is allowed to provide. For example, you may not be told about actions taken against a University employee or student as a result of your allegation because that information may be deemed "private" under applicable law. You also may not be told information that is deemed to be legally privileged or otherwise confidential.
  12. Is there a University policy that talks about the hotline and reporting?
    The University's Administrative Policy: Reporting and Addressing Concerns of Misconduct can be accessed here. The supporting procedure can be accessed here.

Protections for Reporters

  1. What should I do if I feel I am being retaliated against for making the report?
    The University prohibits retaliation for making good faith reports. If you believe you are the victim of retaliation for making a report, or have concerns about retaliation, contact the Office of the Vice President for Human Resources at 612-624-6556.

Student Concerns

  1. I'm a Student. What should I report here?
    If you are a student employee and your concern relates to an issue connected with your employment, you should file a report here. If you have concerns about misconduct involving University staff, faculty, volunteers, or other University representatives; or any other concerns about the safety of University facilities used by students, you should select the category "Student Concerns" to file a report.

    What not to report here.
    If you are a student and have a concern relating to cheating by another student or the student conduct code, residence life, behavior of another student, or are otherwise not sure where to report your concern, contact the Office of Student Affairs at acadweb@umn.edu.

More on Anonymous and Confidential Reporting

  1. Can I make a truly anonymous report?
    Yes. This reporting service is provided by an independent company called EthicsPoint. EthicsPoint provides phone and Web reporting services to organizations across the country. EthicsPoint does not trace phone calls. EthicsPoint does not generate or maintain internal connection logs with IP addresses, so no information linking your computer to EthicsPoint is available. Reports from your computer come through a secure internet portal. The internet portal does not trace or show user screen names, and EthicsPoint removes internet addresses so that anonymity in the EthicsPoint system is maintained.
  1. Where does my report go? Who at the University sees my report?
    All reports are made available to the University's Auditor and Director of Institutional Compliance. In addition, reports are communicated to specific University officials based upon the details of the report. Reports are categorized by campus location, allegation category (e.g., "financial," "Employment & HR") and particular allegation type (e.g., "theft", "discrimination"). Many of these locations, categories, and types have a particular person or persons pre-identified to receive and handle such reports. For example, the athletic compliance director for a particular campus (NCAA concerns for that campus) will get reports for athletic issues. The University official handling the report is then able to share the report or parts of the report with others at the University who may need to see it for investigation or for work-related purposes. The identity of a reporter will remain confidential and is subject to disclosure under the University's Reporting and Addressing Concerns of Misconduct Policy.
  2. Will anyone outside the University see my report?
    Reports may be made available to other persons, agencies or organizations that have a statutory or other legal authority to gain access, for example to comply with a court order or subpoena.
  3. If I file a report anonymously, will anyone at the University ever learn my identity?
    The University will not learn your identity from EthicsPoint if you file an anonymous report. In some circumstances, however, your identity may nevertheless become apparent. For example, this may occur where the particular facts of a report suggest that it must have come from one person, or the reporter's identity becomes clear during the course of investigating the report. In all cases, the University forbids retaliation based upon making a good faith report and provides resources to assist reporters concerned about retaliation.
  4. Will my supervisor be told about the allegation? Who else in my unit might find out?
    Your supervisor may or may not be told about your allegation, depending upon the particular circumstances of your report. In most cases, leadership within the department or unit where the wrongdoing is alleged to have occurred will be notified, as well as others who may have a need to know parts of a report in order to do their jobs or assist in any investigation. This notice typically includes general information about the nature of the allegation. This is necessary in many cases because employees in the unit or department may be interviewed, asked for documents, or otherwise involved in an investigation. In some cases, a supervisor may not be told about an allegation until an initial investigation has taken place, documents or evidence secured, or other actions are taken to ensure the matter is fully investigated and resolved.
  1. My report will say that a co-worker or supervisor is doing something wrong. Will that person learn I am the source of the report?
    This depends in some degree upon the specifics of your allegation, and whether you report anonymously. If you are reporting an incident that was observed by several people, or where documents or physical evidence exists (even if you don't have the evidence yourself), the University may be able to fully investigate the matter without revealing you as the reporter. If, for example, no documents or other evidence exists to support an allegation other than your report, the University may be unable to further investigate the matter or to impose disciplinary action unless you come forward. In these cases, the University will work with you to provide you with appropriate resources and protection to assure you will not be treated unfairly for having raised a good faith concern in the event your identity is made known.
  2. Can I continue to provide information to the University after I've filed a report and remain anonymous?
    Yes. The reporting service allows you to continue to communicate anonymously with the University about a report if you chose to do so. You may receive and submit questions, answers, or electronic records through EthicsPoint. You may request to schedule an online chat with the University, or you may post and receive messages. (See "How can I follow up on a report I've made?").
  3. Who can I talk to about making a report or this reporting service?
    The University has a variety of resources you may want to consider about where and how and whether to make a report. A list of offices that handle reports is listed under the link "Other Reporting Options and Resources" on the Web homepage. You may call those offices directly. As another option, you may contact the Director of Office of Institutional Compliance at 612-626-7852.